Cherry (cheery_blossom) wrote in swimfroggyswim,
Cherry
cheery_blossom
swimfroggyswim

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Quick Question

Hi! I know that this is kind of a slow community, but I was wondering if anyone could help me with something.

I'm a swimmer on a  high school team and, quite honestly, I'm not that good, and looking to improve, especially in the 500 free. I've been told that to do this, I have to improve my pace. And to do that, is it as simple as: swim faster, or is there something I can do to help me swim faster.

Basically, I just want to know if there's a way I can build endurance. Thanks for any help you can give!
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  • 17 comments
i think the best way, in my opinion, would be to do several (10 to 20) 100's and try to keep around the same time for all of them.
Thanks for your help! This idea sounds good, so thanks!
flip turns!
if you drop a second off each turn, say, not breathing, or actually learning how to flip turn (like i need to do. i'm a distance person too. & i'm not that great), then that's a 20-second drop right there. okay, technically 19.
Yeah, I need to get better on these too- I scrunch on the wall. Thanks!
I'll second both of the previous comments. when I was in High School, I swam 500's as well. One thing that we did during practices when we were doing things for time, was that I worked out a signaling pattern for the placement of the lap counters. If it was on the left side, I was slow. If it was centered, I was on pace, if it was on the right, I'm ahead. If the guy is pumping it up and down, coach wants me to get moving, if it's swaying or holding steady, I'm to maintain the pace. That'll help you get some 'real time' feedback as you work out and compete.

To build up the endurance, the best thing I can offer you is to put in yardage and lots of it. You're not going for speed so your sets, in my opinion, should be a lot of yards with reasonable, yet challenging, times.

Best of luck and keep us in the loop!!

Anonymous

December 27 2006, 01:09:07 UTC 10 years ago

Thanks for the help, I really like this idea.
Me, sorry for the "anon".
my lap counter sometimes does that, depends on who it is, and if i tell them to.

Only difference is moving the counter from left to right, speed up, up and down, slow down (which I am yet to see), and just a normal in the water, is good pace.
do 200s. tons of 200s. theyre excellent for endurance. if you can do those, you can do 100s easily. then hold 100s on the pace that you plan to for your 500. goood luck!
Thanks!
As part of improving your turns, do your best not to breathe into or out of the turns. For example, don't breathe inside the flags or take at least three strokes before taking your first breath on any given length. It works, trust me. I actually did this for practice before and during my junior year, and I dropped a fair amount of time. I didn't do it senior year, and didn't improve my time at all (in fact, I got slower).
Really? I'll have to start trying that tommorow's practice. Thanks so much!
I would say form. make sure your hands are cupped, and you are rotating. also barely stick your head out of the water to breath.

another thing, on the flip turn, underwater pull out, I use to not kick, and just be stream line, but I ended up taking time off when I did dophin kick.

good luck.
ps: i like your icon.
Thanks, on both- the input on form (need to work on this too) and icon!
Forgot to say: I love your icon too!
i agree with what everyone is saying so far, it's all great advise. one more thing...my coach had me kick really hard when i got back to the surface (after doing underwater dolphin kicks of course) then to back it off a little bit to get back into rythme. this really helps to get your stroke back up to speed so you don't lose any momentum comming off the wall.
Okay, I'll try this-honestly, I've never done underwater dolphin kicks, so this is really great advice. Thank you!